Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry
Forest Tenure Modernization

Ontario’s Forest Industry Today

 

1. A vibrant and important part of Ontario’s economy

2. In total, the forest industry supports over 150,000 jobs in more than 260 communities in Ontario

3. In 2015, the total revenue generated from  the Ontario forest sector was about $15.5  billion

  • $9.2 billion from sales of pulp and paper products
  • $4.3 billion from sawmill, engineered wood, and other wood product manufacturing sales
  • $1.1 billion from logging

 

4. The forest sector contributed  0.8%, or nearly, $5 billion, to Ontario’s GDP in 2015

5. Ranks third (behind Quebec and British Columbia) in terms of harvest area

6. Sustainable forest management of Ontario’s forests ensures long term forest health.

     

 
1 From “Aquatic Ecosystems of the Far North of Ontario: State of Knowledge” 2011, page 5
2 Ontario’s interests are represented in community based land use planning, joint planning teams and preparation of the Far North Land Use Strategy, by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF)
3 MNRF represents Ontario’s interests on joint planning teams
4 Under the Far North Act, 2010, if a community based land use plan is made or amended after a mining claim, mining lease, patents or license of occupation for mining purposes is issued in an area to which the plan applies, nothing in the plan shall affect the validity of the mining claim, mining lease, patents or license of occupation (see section 14(3) of the Far North Act, 2010)
5 Pauingassi and Little Grand Rapids are communities located in Manitoba but with areas of traditional use that span into Ontario.
6 Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, Provincial Policy Statement: Under the Planning Act, April 30, 2014, p.40 http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/AssetFactory.aspx?did=10463
7 Colombo, S.J., D.W. McKenney, K.M. Lawrence and P.A. Gray. 2001. Climate change projections for Ontario: Practical information for policymakers and planners. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Climate Change Research Report CCRR-05, Sault Ste. Marie, ON pg. 49
8 Sustainability in a Changing Climate: A Strategy for the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, pg.9
9 Colombo, S.J., D.W. McKenney, K.M. Lawrence and P.A. Gray. 2001. Climate change projections for Ontario: Practical information for policymakers and planners. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Climate Change Research Report CCRR-05. Sault Ste. Marie, ON.
10 For further information on peatlands, see box “Peatslands – Carbon Sink vs Resource?”.
11 Ontario’s Climate Change Action Plan 2007 and “Climate Ready”, see http://www.ontario.ca/ministry-environment
12 “Sustainability in a Changing Climate” (MNRF, 2011)
13 Canadian Wetland Classification System, Second Edition, By the National Wetlands Working Group / Edited by B.G. Warner and C.D.A. Rubec, 1997, pg 1 http://www.gret-perg.ulaval.ca/fileadmin/fichiers/fichiersGRET/pdf/Doc_generale/Wetlands.pdf
14 “Science for a Changing Far North”, April 2010, page 68
15 The Guide for Crown Land Use Planning sets out designations used in planning south of the Far North boundary. The Guide for Crown Land Use Planning does not apply in the Far North, however the designations and other policies in the Guide can help inform the development of designations and guidance for use in community based land use planning in the Far North.
16 These prohibitions are in keeping with international standards for protected areas
17 The Far North Act, 2010 provides the Minister with the ability to regulate categories of protected area to provide greater certainty about the categories and the permitted/non permitted uses.
18 The Far North Act, 2010 requires that community based land use plans must specify a review timeframe, which shall not be more frequently than once every 10 years after the plan is approved. (Section 9(9)(f)).